Les 5 du Vin

5 journalistes parlent du vin


5 Commentaires

The Loire comes to Newtonmore

Mountain view

Newtonmore is a village in the Highlands of Scotland – up in the Cairngorms overlooked by mountains. Whether people living in the Alps would call them mountains is another matter as few are over 4000 feet. They should not be treated lightly, however, especially in winter as they are a good 1000 miles north of the Alps. The weather can change with frightening rapidity going from a bright clear day to a white-out in just a few minutes.  Just as in the Alps there are a number fatalities on these mountains every year.

Newtonmore, which is is about 45 miles south of Inverness – the capital of the Highlands –  used to be on the main road (A9) from Edinburgh to the north of Scotland. Now the new trunk road version of the A9 bypasses all the villages and towns on its  way to Inverness, so compared to London the roads are relatively quiet here.

The village still has a railway station and surprisingly, although it is just a single platform and is unmanned it is possible to catch the sleeper to and from London.  This is where I will be, at least until early April.

All in all this is a rather long intro to explain that despite being confined to the Scottish Highlands I am still able to taste some Loire wines, which producers have kindly sent to me here so I can continue to work.

2017 Coteaux du Giennois, Clément and Florian Berthier

2017 Coteaux du Giennois, Florian and Clément Berthier

 

This 2017 Coteaux du Giennois from Clément and Florian Berthier is simply delicious – not complex but lovely, very clean citric aromas and flavours including grapefruit notes. Vignobles Berthier is based in Sainte Gemme en Sancerrois. The domaine was founded by Jean-Marie Berthier in 1983 and now has nearly 25 hectares making Sancerre, Menetou-Salon, Pouilly-Fumé and Coteaux du Giennois.

This wine is represented by

Chris Hardy & Charles Sydney
Charles Sydney Wines Ltd
Petite Maison
11 Quai Danton, 37500 Chinon
France
Tél :  (France) 02 47 81 44 03
They arrange sales to the UK wine trade.  

••••

2015 Domaine René Couly, Chinon, Couly-Dutheil

Domaine René Couly is another fine 2015 red from Couly-Dutheil. These vines are planted on clay and flint and from parcels selected by René Couly, the grandfather of the company’s current MD – Arnaud Couly.

The deep coloured 2015 Domaine René Couly is considerably more concentrated than Wednesday’s featured wine – 2015 Les Gravières. Although drinking well now, the René Couly has considerably potential to improve and age over several decades. 

•••

   

Encore Couly-Dutheil – 2015 Baronnie Madeleine

2015 Baronnie Madeleine, Chinon from Couly-Dutheil 

 Couly-Dutheil only release the Baronnie Madeleine cuvée in good vintages. 2015 is certainly on of them. Baronnie Madeleine comes from selected parcels on the clay limestone slopes or the plateau above these slopes. The 2015 has attractive concentration and plenty of soft black fruit. Very enjoyable to drink now it lacks, for the moment (?), an extra dimension. On the other hand it is noticeable that the tannin management is greatly improved over the last decade. Gone are the dry, harsh tannins that marred their wines in the first decade following the millennium.  

 

****

2015 Château de l’Aulnaye, Muscadet Sèvre et Maine, Château Thébaud

2015 Château de l’Aulnaye, Muscadet Sèvre et Maine,
Château Thébaud, Famille Lieubeau 

This very fine rich and concentrated Muscadet spends three years on its lees. It is the style of cru communaux, although Château Thébaud has yet to be formally recognised the French government rather to the understandable frustration of those eligible to benefit from the new appellation.

This style of Muscadet is far removed from the fresh citric version that goes so well with shellfish. We drank the 2015 Château de l’Aulnaye with salmon with butter and lemon in a parcel – a fine match. This Muscadet also worked well with some mature Montgomery cheddar. 

The Lieubeaus are important growers in Château Thébaud.  

  

Chinese cap


14 Commentaires

Central Loire Vineyards – 1990 – 2017

CrossSancerres

1990 - 2017a

The last 27 years has seen very considerably changes in the Central Loire Vineyards. With one sole exception it has been a tale of success and expansion. It is fascinating to compare the area planted in each of the Central Loire appellation in 1990 with the area planted in 2017.

An overall increase of 2451 hectares in production – a 77% increase – are the headline figures. However, the dramatic revival of appellations such as Quincy and Reuilly that in the 1970s and for much of the 1980s are perhaps the most interesting. The revival of Reuilly owes much to the late Claude Lafond, who had the vision to persuade the few producers to work together and to establish a common wine-making facility above the small town of Reuilly. It was similar in neighbouring Quincy where a common winery was built at the village of Brinay. These wineries are different from a cave co-operative. Here the producers make with guidance, keep and sell their own wine themselves. The facilities are shared but not the wine.

Equally the expansion of Menetou-Salon up by nearly 200% from 196 hectares in 1990 to 576 ha last year is impressive. Sancerre and Pouilly-Fumé have seen the largest increase in terms of hectares – 1032 ha and 580ha respectively.

Pouilly-sur-Loire – 100% Chasselas – is the only appellation in decline: slipping from 56 hectares planted in 1990 to just 27 last year. Doubtless those lost hectares of Chasselas have been replanted with Sauvignon Blanc – Pouilly-Fumé is so much easier to sell.

The changes in the Central Loire are in marked contrast with the contraction in the area planted with Melon de Bourgogne for Muscadet in the Pays Nantais. In 1990 all the Muscadet appellations covered 11,280 hectares – this doesn’t include Muscadet Côtes de Grandlieu which was promoted to appellation status in 1994. At its highest point Muscadet reached some 13300 hectares. By 2016 this area had dropped to a total of 8200 ha. Of these Muscadet Sèvre et Maine accounted for 6300 ha, Côtes de Grandlieu – 230 ha, Coteaux de la Loire – 150 ha.

Even with this sharp contraction Muscadet (820 ha) is still substantially larger than the whole of the Central Vineyard combined – 5750 hectares.

 

Visit to FilipaP