Les 5 du Vin

5 journalistes parlent du vin


15 Commentaires

Looking for flor: Vin Jaune, Jerez and Tokay Szamorodni 2/2

As I promised at the end of my article of last week,(https://les5duvin.wordpress.com/2018/02/05/different-roads-to-flor-vin-jaune-xeres-and-tokay-szamorodni/) this second article will attempt to provide more details, both  technical and historical,  about flor wines that were exposed and explained during the recent symposium organized at Lons-le-Saulnier in France’s Jura region.

a). Vin Jaune, Jura

These wines are followed from a technical point of view by the Beaune office of the Institut Français de la Vigne et du Vin (IFV). The grape variety used for Vin Jaune is the savagnin (aka traminer), which has been clearly identified in this region since the 16th century. Some people maintain that this grape variety produces its best results on soils of a specific type known as marnes bleues, but a local geologist gently debunked this theory, saying that Savagnin works well on many types of soil, being particularly hardy; yet other varieties suffer more (notably from hydrous stress) on these dense marnes bleus and so growers have learnt by bitter experience to plant mainly Savagnin there. Currently there are 450 hectares of Savagnin in the Jura, but not all of it is for Vin Jaune. It would also seem that regular production of Vin Jaune here is fairly recent, dating from the late 19th century as previously it happened or not and was often considered as an accident or even a problem, prior to research on the specific forms of yeasts involved in the production of the protective flor veil (voile, as it is called here and in Gaillac where some wines of this type are also produced). The grapes are harvested at a high level of maturity as this variety is capable of maintaining high acidity levels even when producing a dry wine of 14,5 or 15% alcohol. Fermentation temperatures are not particularly low, typically around 20/22°C. Malolactic fermentation is advisable on account of the danger of bacterial infections.

Saccharomyces cerevisae

So, we have here a rare and complex wine whose production is still largely based on accumulated experience, even if many things are now known about the conditions necessary for its production. One of the results of the presence and growth of these yeasts of the saccharomyces family (essentially the cerevisae strains) is the production of ethanal, or acetaldehyde, and the ideal quantity of this not always beneficial substance (it is also deemed responsible for hangovers!) is considered to be around 500 mg per litre of Vin Jaune. The voile is thinner than in the case of Sherry, as I mentioned last week. The growth of this voile is also irregular through the ageing process, partially due to the struggle for survival of this particular yeast strain as there may be up to 1200 different strains present and not all of them are good news for the wine. Currently the IFV has just 300 of them isolated in their collection. Although often (usually?) present in the cellars, the yeasts can be introduced from selected strains if needed. These yeasts consume various substances such as oxygen, glycerol, acetic acid and amino acids, while releasing peptides and polysaccharides and producing the above-mentioned ethanal. For this to happen properly, the levels of alcohol need to be above 13% and the levels of SO2 below 12 mg/l, and very small doses of sulfites are required later on. The environment naturally influences the nature of the wine, as higher levels of humidity will reduce evaporation.

To finish this chapter on Vin Jaune, here are a few notes on my preferred wines from some older vintages of these wines that were presented on the day. They go from younger to older without any form of hierarchy. The oldest wines on show went back to 1996, but these wines are renowned for their capacity to age much longer still.

Henri Maire 2000, Arbois

Still seems very young. Nice balance between fruit and the naturally dry austerity that shows on the finish of almost all these wines.

Domaine Philippe Butin 2000, Côtes du Jura

Quite fine, with good balance between fruit and freshness. Complex too.

Grand Frères, En Beaumont 1999, Château-Chalon

A finely toasted edge to the nose that lifts the usual notes of nuts. This added complexity is echoed on the plate with a hint of honey and wax, even if there is no residual sugar. Good complexity.

Château d’Arlay 1998, Côtes du Jura

The aromas are richly warm, combining dried fruits of all kinds as well as the classic touch of walnuts. It also has far more fresh fruit that has persisted amongst the flavours than the others wines in this tasting. A lovely wine, vibrant and complex, that shows that age can also produce beauty.

b). Jerez, Xérès, Sherry

The only appellation in the world that is truly international in its denomination as this is written officially in three languages on each bottle: Spanish, French and English. This fact alone is enough to arouse both my interest and my affection. The region lies at the southern tip of Spain, just north of the port of Cadiz and within a kind of triangle formed by three towns: Sanlúcar de Barrameda, Jerez and et Puerto Real de Santa María. The figure that I found the most impressive was provided at the start of the first presentation of this Andalusian appellation. It is the recent and spectacular drop in the vineyard surface. From the 20,000 hectares planted in 1980, there remain just 7,000 today!

The key grape variety here is the white Palomino, which, well adapted to this hot climate, naturally produces low levels of sugar whilst maintaining good acidity. The soils are essentially of a very white limestone known locally as albariza. This results in dry wines of between 11 and 13% alcohol, the lower levels coming from the sub-regions nearest to the ocean. These dry wines, after fermentation at temperatures between 20 and 23°C, are fairly neutral and are fortified with wine alcohol to 15%. The barrels, which are old and made from American oak, then become naturally infested with flor yeasts which are present in the bodegas and the barrels. They are larger than those used in the Jura for Vin Jaune (228 litres) as they contain 500/600 litres. Another major difference here is the ambient temperature down near the southern tip of Spain. This is tempered by prevailing winds, one of which comes in from the Atlantic, bearing also considerable humidity. In order to adapt to this temperature, the storage buildings are high, enabling the hotter air to rise above the level of the barrels, and the doors and windows are kept shut at the warmest periods and opened to let in cooler air when appropriate. The floor is also watered to maintain humidity, which is not necessary in the Jura or in Tokay.

Flor yeasts are endemic by now in most (all?) cellars as this style of wine has been regularly produced in the area since the early 19th century, following the removal of a ban on storing wines in the Jerez area. Wines of the flor type are called Fino, or Manzanilla for the version produced near the ocean front. If the flor does weaken, then the fortification is increased to a level of 18% alcohol, and the ageing process becomes purely oxidative. These stronger sherries can be called Amontillado, Oloroso or, more rarely, Palo Cortado, according to differences in their characters. These are all totally dry, although sweet or semi-sweet sherries also exist, generally through the blending in of sweet wine made from another, and very different, local grape called the Pedro Ximénez (PX for short). These wines are not flor wines either and so I will not discuss them here.

As the ageing process continues for the Fino styles, the flor diminishes in thickness as the glycerin is consumed. Another specific feature of the vast majority of sherries is that they do not bear a vintage year since they are aged according to the solera system which involves blending wines together from different harvest years. There are some exceptions, that I will mention later. The term solera literally signifies an area on the ground that is occupied by a batch of barrels. The above photos and diagrams show this. The wines are blended by drawing off wine from the bottom layer of barrels and bottling it. This is called the saca (hence the term in English of sack in connection with some sherries: Dry Sack for instance is a brand name used by Williams & Humbert for their Fino). The equivalent volume is replaced by wine from the level above, always leaving air space for the flor to continue its life, and so on up the different levels, known as criaderas. This refilling is done gently in order to avoid disturbing the flor. The process is in fact more complex that this diagram shows, but it gives the general idea. Single vintage sherries also exist with Williams & Humbert since the 1920’s (and some others more recently) and these undergo a static biological ageing that does not involve this dynamic blending process using different criaderas. In this case the flor usually lasts for up to ten years. The more glycerin in the wine, the stronger the flor and both levels of alcohol and of pH also have an influence. I have mentioned the production of ethanal, but it is not the sole by-product of the flor. As to other, less desirable strains of yeasts such as the dreaded brettanomyces, these exist in Jerez as elsewhere but they are discouraged by the fortification process. Maybe all so-called « natural » wines should therefore be fortified? (joke).

Tasting of sherries

1). Williams & Humbert

The English name of this company bears witness to the historical importance of the British market for these wines. When and where I grew up, Sherry, both Fino and Amontillado, was the main aperitif drink at home and in the houses of my parents friends and relations. The owners are now the Medina family and the wines were presented by Paola Medina.

Don Zoilo Fino en Rama

Warm and complex on the nose, full with rich notes of dried fruit. profound and well rounded on the palate. This clearly shows considerable ageing which has helped develop its complexity. In fact at least 8 years for the soleras involved. Loved this wine.

PS. I also tasted recently, on another occasion, the same producer’s more basic Fino, called Dry Sack (11 euros in Nicolas wine shops in France). It was good and true to type, effectively fine in texture and nutty in its flavours. I served it during a course on Spanish wines, proving once again that most people, at least in France, have some trouble getting used to such wines. Only 1 of 12 students that evening said that they liked the wine and the same happens with Vin Jaune. A niche market I believe they call such situations.

Fino, Añada 2010 (saca octubre 2017)

3,5 pH / 4 g/l tartaric acid

alcohol 15%

This being from a single vintage is not a solera wine, but is aged nonetheless under flor. Quite intense on the nose, herbaceous (hay and straw) in its accents, with a feeling of contained power. Vibrant and very long. Aged statically for 7 years in US oak casks of 600 litres.

Amontillado Añada 2003 (saca noviembre 2017)

2,98 pH, 6.19g/l tartaric acid

alcohol 20%

A hugely seductive nose, full of hints of honey and beeswax, dried apricots, dried flowers. Very dry but powerful through its alcohol, still maintaining subtle fruit flavours, both dried and fresh. Very complex and very long finish. Loved this!

Aged statically for 14 years in US oak casks (500 and 600 litres)

2). Valdespino and La Guita

Manzanilla La Guita

origin Sanlucar, mainly Pago de Miraflores

4,5 g/l total acidity

15% alcohol

I loved the delicacy and the expression of the nose of this but forgot to take full notes.

Valdespino Palo Cortado Viejo C.P.

I took no notes on the smell (too many Jurassiens blocking the tables!), but the palate is sumptuous, powerful and very complex, well rounded out by the alcohol but magnificently harmonious and long. One of my favourite wines in the room!

3). Equipo Navazos

La Bota de Florpower MMXV

This is a non-fortified flor wine, so only has 12% alcohol. Very fresh, delicate and with a very dry finish. 

La Bota de Manzanilla 71

Great richness, long fine and powerful. Liked the complexity of this.

La Bota de Manzanilla Pasada 70 (magnum)

Austere but very long. Firmly dry finish

La Bota de Amontillado 69 (magnum)

This was the one I preferred of this series. Has a more tender set of aromas and textures, while remaining very juicy. Lots of inner substance and complexity

c). Tokay Szamorodni

Just one representative from this region of eastern Hungary (and a little bit of Slovakia too), but a very interesting one in the shape of the Frenchman Samuel Tinon, who, with his 5 hectares of vines, produces some very good wines and is perhaps one of the few Tokay producers to be really involved in continuing the flor style of Szamorodni, although he said that this is a niche product that is enjoying somewhat of a revival in some markets. It should be remembered that Tokay is a region, and not only a name for that region’s sweet wines, since these dry wines (and others) also carry the Tokay appellation. In fact, 70% of Tokay’s total production comes from non-botrytised grapes.

There are currently 130 producers of Tokay in Hungary, showing a sharp increase from the situation back when the iron curtain fell and the giant bor kombinat (state cooperative) was dismantled. Most of the initial investors in this legendary region for the production of long-lasting and mostly sweet wines came from outside Hungary (USA, UK, France, Italy and Spain), but now there are also growing numbers of smaller and mostly local producers doing their own thing.

A Szamorodni is an unusual wine as it is one of the very few (only?) affirmed types of dry wine made from botrytised grapes. It can in fact be dry or off-dry whilst including quite a high proportion of botrytised grapes, because the term itself refers to a state of the bunches of grapes that contain a mixture of healthy and botrytis-affected grapes, so the finished wines can vary as to their sugar content. This logic is similar to the one that prevails in German wine legislation with the Pradikat system. The ones that Tinon showed are not only totally dry but also aged under a veil in small barrels. The veil is quite slender, as in the case of Vin Jaune. Alcohol levels for these dry wines start quite high but stand at around 13% on the finished wines with no fortification, having reduced naturally at a rate of about 0,5 degrees per year with little loss of volume. This time factor can mean between 4 and 7 years in small barrels and underground cellars in a humid atmosphere (over 85% humidity). These wines are vintaged systematically,  there being no equivalent of the solera system that prevails in Jérèz.

All the three wines tasted come from a blend of Furmint (9o%) and Harsevelu (10%).

Samuel Tinon, Tokay Szamorodni 2003

More tender and aromatic than any of the Vins Jaunes, this shows aromas of ripe white fruit, such as juicy pears. Despite this it finished perfectly dry, with considerable length and a touch that is more delicate than the somewhat rustic feel of many Vins Jaunes.

Samuel Tinon, Tokay Szamorodni 2007

The nose shows whiffs of honey and gingerbread. The texture is silky, barely masking considerable inner power that shows through to the long finish.

Samuel Tinon, Tokay Szaraz  Szamorodni 2006

This one has even more concentration and complexity. Great length too.

 

Hope you enjoyed this two-stage trip into these unusual wines that are, as I have said, very much an acquired taste. I love them personally!

David Cobbold


9 Commentaires

Looking for Flor (Vin Jaune, Xérès and Tokay Szamorodni) 1/2

No, I can assure you that Flor is not the first name of a new friend of mine.

I have just returned from a brief stay in France’s Jura region to participate in a symposium about « flor » wines: in other words wines that develop their specific style through ageing under a veil of yeast on the surface of barrels which have not been fully topped up to compensate natural evaporation. The word « flor » is Spanish for flower, as, in the case of sherries at least, the surface of the wine in the part-filled barrels looks as if flowers have grown on it. The yeast strains bloom on the surface which take on a whitish-grey veil of variable thickness. Some refer to this process as « biological ageing », as opposed to reductive or oxidative ways of ageing wines that require modification before they are fit for consumption on account of an overtly intensive structural profile of some description.

This opportunity arose thanks to an excellent initiative on the part of the Jura producers, who, like those in Cahors, consider that collaboration with producers from other countries who produce similar styles of wine to theirs can bring many positive results, rather than looking on others as just competitors to be shunned at all costs. I hope that such mentalities and ideas will gain ground in the future. In any case, judging by the numbers of specialist journalists who came especially for this symposium (English, French, Belgians and Swiss were there), one could say that the organisers have marked some points. The symposium was preceeded by a tasting which brought together quite a large number of vins jaunes, the local flor wine, as well as a couple of very good producers of Sherry and an excellent producer of a Tokay Szamorodni made also under a yeast veil. The timing was set to coincide with the annual festivities surrounding the traditional Percée du Vin Jaune, some of whose more folklore-filled aspects I witnessed. I was also able to participate in the annual Vin Jaune competition called clavelinage, which serves to awards medals to the vins jaunes that the jury members esteem to be the best representatives of the latest vintages of this very singular style of wine.

Flor in a Sherry butt

I say singular, because these wines produce aromas and flavours that not everyone likes, at least spontaneously and without a form of apprenticeship that few are prepared to undertake. After all, put simply, why should one suffer in order to learn to appreciate something? I would beg to differ from this postulate, but, in our individualistic world of instant gratification, efforts to overcome a natural resistance, whether physical or mental, are not always welcomed with open arms. I can clearly testify to the aversion that the vast majority of wine drinkers have for this style of wine since, whenever I serve a Vin Jaune or a dry Sherry to students in one of my classes, almost all of them wrinkle their noses in an expression of distaste and sometimes even ask if all is right with the wine! The appreciation of the aromas and flavours of a dry Sherry or a Vin Jaune are clearly acquired by a certain amount of practice, which obviously favours natives of the Jura region in France, as well as Spanish or even English people, the latter two having traditionally consumed large quantities of Sherry. Conversions to these flavours are rare, it must be said, but those who become converted are often fanatical, as befits such patterns. According to Samuel Tinon, who showed his Tokay Szamorodnis at this symposium, Brooklyn NYC is the latest terre d’accueil for his wines.

Some other countries and regions produce tiny amounts of wines of this type, but they are rare. What was particularly interesting in the presentations that each country or producer gave after the morning’s tasting session was to learn how local climatic conditions, constraints and production techniques have produced differences in the wines and the way in which they evolve. The Sherry production region is dry and hot, with a strong oceanic influence from the Atlantic. Its bodegas are above the ground with very high ceilings to allow the air to circulate. The flor here is usually quite thick and helps to slow down evaporation. Unlike the other two regions for flor wines, Sherries are fortified, even if lightly, after the fermentation, but from a wine with lower alcohol levels than that of the savagnin in the Jura. The Jura has high rainfall and generally cool temperatures, and its cellars are smaller. The flor is much thinner on the whole. Partly through concentration over time, and partly through the character of the late-ripening Savagnin grape, the alcohol levels of the finished vin jaune are usually very close to those of a Fino or Manzanilla Sherry (I saw 14,5 and even 15% on some labels). The Tokay region is very humid and warmer, but the cellars are underground and low. And so on. The intensity and thickness of the flor is different in each case, as are the results of the ageing process, and these differences have multiple causes, including market pressures and production habits.

As this photo shows perhaps, flor on Vin Jaune tends to be somewhat thinner than on Sherry

Now for some notes on my favourite wines in the tasting on the day of the symposium.

1). Vin Jaune

For those unfamiliar with the wines of the Jura region, several appellations may produce this type of wine in the region: Côtes de Jura, Arbois, Etoile and Château Chalon. The latter appellation only produces Vin Jaune. In all cases it has to be made from 100% Savagnin blanc (sometimes called Traminer) and cannot be bottled before December, six years after the harvest date, having spent at least five years in small barrels. It must not then be sold before January 1st seven years after the harvest, and can only be bottled in a bottle of a special shape and size (62 cl), called a clavelin.

Vins Jaunes vintage 2010

André & Jean-François Michel, Côtes du Jura

Very old-style label, for those who like that sort of thing, complete with coat of arms and gothic script titles. Yet the wine is anything but dusty: on the contrary, it seems fresh and alert, still showing some fruit-based flavours and is not over-dry on the finish. Very pleasant in this style. This wine did not appear in the catalogue and thus I cannot provide its retail price, which is probably around 25 euros.

Fruitière Vinicole d’Arbois, Arbois

Another local feature in the Jura region is the role and the quality of the cooperative wineries, known curiously as « fruitières ». Lots of complexity on the nose with aromas of dried fruit and nuts. Very nicely balanced, very fresh and with some lingering fruit flavours. Excellent. (30 euros)

Rolet Père et Fils, Arbois

Very nutty on the nose. Lots of freshness on the palate and a general impression of controlled power. This producer is one of the most regular in the region and for all styles of white wines. (30 euros)

 

Fruitière de Voiteur, Château Chalon

Nice level of complexity on the nose. Good substance and balance between fruit, acidity and a slightly phenological character that one often finds in such wines. This has plenty of power and length without the alcohol showing too much. Another excellent cooperative producer. (29,50 euros)

 

Domaine Baud, Côtes de Jura

A pleasant nose in a style rather similar to that of a Fino Sherry. Lots of freshness for this dynamic wine and a slighty chewy texture that shows a touch of bitterness on the finish. (29 euros)

 

Château d’Arlay, Côtes de Jura

This fine historical domain is another regular top performer of the region. This particular wine will need a bit of time to express itself fully but it has all the necessary qualities, with good freshness and balance (38 euros).

 

 

Although not all producers from the region were showing their wines here, some other producers showed decent wines in this 2010 vintage that some tasters might prefer to my pick: Fruitière Pupillin (Arbois), Domaine de Savagny (Côtes de Jura), and Domaine de la Renardière (Arbois). The others I liked much less or had some defects.

There were also some other flor wines from the Jura on show, which were younger and so do not qualify for the Vin Jaune appellation. My favourite wines from this group were those of Jean-Louis Tissot (Arbois Savagnin 2014), of Domaine Montbourgeau (Etoile, cuvée spéciale 2014) and of André Bonnot (Côtes de Jura Savagnin 2014).

Next week I will tell you about the Sherries and the Tokay Szamorodnis and give you some more technical information from the conferences as well as mentioning the excellent ageing potential of these wines as there were some examples of older Vins Jaunes that I tasted.

 

David Cobbold

 

 

 


14 Commentaires

Moules et blancs du Jura – oxydatifs ou pas

La mer est loin de la Franche Comté, quoiqu’elle y fut il y a quelques millions d’années; mais depuis son retrait, peu d’embruns du côté du Revermont. Mais faut-il accorder invariablement coquillages et vins côtiers, Muscadet et Mytilidés, Picpoul et Ostréidés, Entre-deux-Mers et autres bivalves appréciés ? Pas forcément!

Le Jura peut nous apporter une originalité, celle des vins oxydatifs, sans aller jusqu’au Jaune, pour varier nos habitudes souvent bien installées. C’était le challenge de ce petit voyage de presse au pays de Courbet.

Premier challenge, la moule dans toute sa grâce

Pas facile, ce coquillage, son goût est prononcé, sa texture est assez particulière, entre croquant et mou, bizarre quoi et selon la façon dont on le prépare, les paramètres précités peuvent vraiment changer.

Premier essai avec les blancs secs ouillés, qu’ils soient issus de Chardonnay ou de Savagnin. Et bien, les petits amis, ça ne fonctionne pas vraiment. La moule a besoin d’autre chose, de plus de considération, de choses plus enrobées, surtout moins tranchantes que ces vins vifs qui la chamboulent.

Laurent au moule-truck

J’oubliais de donner la préparation, simple, à la plancha, tout d’abord nature, sauf un jet de vin blanc en fin de cuisson. Puis, histoire de se la jouer food pairing, cuites (les moules) en compagnies de petits dés de saucisses de Morteau et arrosées en fin de trip d’un bon coup de Jaune.

Là, plus de souci, la moule se sent épanouie et se trémousse sur la langue. Mais déjà, sans Jaune ni Morteau, cela s’accordait fort bien.

Mon choix: moule à la plancha et ses dés de Morteau accompagnée du Côtes du Jura 2011 de Jean Bourdy. Le vin adopte un caractère légèrement oxydatif, juste marqué, il reste frais et élégant, de quoi séduire mademoiselle la Moule. Un duo qui a d’ailleurs séduit nos palais heureux d’accueillir ce joli duo.

Qu’est-ce qui fait que cela fonctionne ? Pas spécialement la saucisse, la moule peut s’en passer. Le Jaune, à peine, il s’est fortement évaporé. Reste la saveur forte du bivalve qui se parfume, avec grâce soulignons-le, des arômes de noix et de noisette, de tisane de plante du vin, lui pique sa légère amertume qui met en exergue son caractère iodé, et il y a l’irrésistible (du moins pour la moule) branche de céleri qui la rend dingue. Sans oublié que ce Côtes du Jura offre un joli qui nous lubrifie tout ça.

Bref, moules et vins oxydatifs, c’est le pied.

Technique du vin : pressurage puis fermentations alcooliques et malolactiques en cuves. Puis vieillissement en tonneaux de vieux chênes pendant 4 ans de contenance de 300 L, 600 L et 1.500 L. Aucun traitement, sauf 2 à 3 mg de SO2 par litre. Le vieillissement lent et long en caves froides permet au terroir très marqué Jura de s’exprimer pleinement dans ces vins blancs, très différent des standards du Chardonnay.

Deuxième rencontre, la coque

 

Y en avait en stock, on ne s’est pas privé. Ici, ce sont les blancs secs qui ont brillés. La coque préfère les élans citronnés et un rien salins des Savagnins ouillés ou l’élégance fraîche et savoureuse d’un Chardonnay. Le coquillage possède certes un goût plutôt relevé, mais une texture bien différente de celle de la moule, je dirais entre élastique et croquant, en relation avec la cuisson.

C’est celui-là le meilleur, nous dit Florian

Ainsi le Chardonnay En Paradis 2015 du Domaine Rijkaert, bien tendu, minéral et un rien tranchant a sublimé le bivalve.

Philippe n’a aucune crainte, pour lui, c’est le sien, le plus apte à satisfaire la coque et nos papilles

Dans le même esprit, mais avec sans doute un peu plus de gourmandise, le Chardonnay Brise Bras 2014 Domaine Daniel Dugois aux accents de tilleul, de mélisse et de réglisse a souligné la chair ferme du bivalve.

Son Savagnin, Benoit nous le sert avec générosité

Quant aux Savagnin, la Cuvée Édouard 2013 Domaine Bernard Badoz parfumé de rose blanche sur fond minéral, très énergique, a emballé le cardia (autre nom de la coque) sans sourciller.

Enfin, l’écorce de citron fondu dans une structure presque tannique du Naturé (Savagnin ouillé) Terre de Marnes 2015 de la Fruitière d’Arbois nous a mis le coquillage sur un plateau, il a eu la délicatesse de s’effacer pour en épurer les notes marines et nous faire comme une giclée d’embruns en bouche.

 Côté vins, il y avait le choix

Une série de dégustation bien sympas qui nous ont démontré qu’en matière d’accords, il ne faut pas d’œillère, juste éviter les clashs…. Et se faire plaisir.

 

Ciao

 

Marco  

 

 


7 Commentaires

Percée du Vin Jaune 2015 sous la neige

IMG_0055

Une Percée un peu rock’n’roll grâce à la neige qui nous a accompagnés tout d’abord sur la route, ensuite le dimanche. Entre les deux, les conditions s’avéraient jurassiennes, humides et fraîches.

???????????????????????????????

Comme à chaque fois mise en bouche le samedi matin avec le Clavelinage qui consiste à élire les vins jaunes les plus représentatifs, ceux que vous offririez à votre voisin pour lui montrer ce que vous arrivez à boire dans vos périples exotiques. Pas toujours facile à déterminer…

IMG_0036

Là, manifestement, Hervé s’ennuie. Mais à chacun son métier, si nous dégustons à la vitesse vv’, nous devons faire preuve de patience et ne pas bailler pour inciter les autres jurés à se grouiller. Quoiqu’il y en ait de particulièrement lents…

Percée 2015 011

Percée 2015 013

Ensuite cap sur Montigny les Arsures, l’endroit de la Percée de cette année, c’est le premier village au nord d’Arbois. Un arrêt pipi par précaution avant d’affronter la foule des grands jours.

Percée 2015 020

Étape dans le caveau occupé par Jean Michel Petit qui nous fait déguster blancs et rouges de Pupillin dont le fameux Poulsard qu’ils ont l’outrecuidance d’appeler Plousard ou Ploussard, histoire de se distinguer d’Arbois qui gît au pied du village sur sa marne rouge perché.

Percée 2015 023

Un stop au caveau de Bacchus, l’un des indigène de l’étape et incontournable. Un Trousseau, Montigny en est la capitale et celui des Aviet reste des plus réputés, croquant, suave et frais à la fois, avec une élégance qui révèle les notes fruitées et épicées avec beaucoup de grâce. Superbe Jaune aussi, tendu et gouteux.

???????????????????????????????
Arrêt chez Dugois, Daniel était là en voisin des Arsures, le village juste au nord, et heureux de nous faire déguster sa gamme. Dont un Trousseau vinifié en blanc qui révèle la couleur d’origine de ses raisins par une impression tannique – surtout quand on sait que c’est lui!

Percée 2015 036
Pour terminer en beauté (et parce qu’il se fait déjà tard), rien de tel que de jouer des coudes pour tenter d’apercevoir le Steph et de constater qu’il n’est pas derrière le comptoir improvisé. Têtus, nous contournons la foule canalisée pour finir par le trouver entre amphores et tonneaux. Presque tout y passe, des Chardonnay frais et voluptueux, une Tour de Curon joyeuse, jusqu’aux Jaunes de terroir, En Spois chaleureux, La Vasée délicate. Avant de passer aux rouges; le Poulsard étant sold out, nous commençons avec le Trousseau Singulier (singulieril l’est par ses arômes délicats de fruits rouges où domine la griotte). Et puis, nous poursuivons avec le Trousseau Amphore, plus sauvage, aux tanins hérissés, aux baies sombres qui craquent sous la dent.

IMG_0054
Un bon moment qui nous laisse pantois, Hervé et moi.

C’est trop court, une journée à la Percée…

Percée 2015 052
Lendemain à nouveau sous la neige, avant de partir plein Ouest vers Angers, dont je parlerai ultérieurement…

Ciao

Percée 2015 053

Marco